National Women’s History Month

As recently as the 1970s, women’s history was virtually an unknown topic in the K-12 curriculum or in general public consciousness. To address this situation, the Education Task Force of the Sonoma County (California) Commission on the Status of Women initiated a “Women’s History Week” celebration for 1978.

The first steps toward success came in February 1980 when President Carter issued the first Presidential Proclamation declaring the Week of March 8th, 1980 as National Women’s History Week. In the same year, Representative Barbara Mikulski, who at the time was in the House of Representatives, and Senator Orrin Hatch co-sponsored a Congressional Resolution for National Women’s History Week 1981. This co-sponsorship demonstrated the wide-ranging political support for recognizing, honoring, and celebrating the achievements of American women.

By 1986, 14 states had already declared March as Women’s History Month. This momentum and state-by-state action was used as the rational to lobby Congress to declare the entire month of March 1987 as National Women’s History Month. In 1987, Congress declared March as National Women’s History Month in perpetuity. A special Presidential Proclamation is issued every year which honors the extraordinary achievements of American women.

The 2018 Theme for National Women’s History Month is “Nevertheless, She Persisted: Honoring Women Who Fight All Forms of Discrimination Against Women.”

Here at Coming of Age, we recognize that the majority of our volunteers are women. Last year:

  • 75% of the total number of volunteers were women
  • 293 women served 38,077 hours at 67 agencies
  • 31% of the women who volunteer are from communities of color

We’d like to acknowledge and say thank you to all our wonderful women volunteers.

 

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